Newbury Racecourse

Newbury Racecourse  The history of Newbury Racecourse dates back to 1905, when it was founded in its current location, approximately two miles south-east of the centre of the market town of Newbury in Berkshire, South East England, by local trainer John Porter, with support from King Edward VII. Porter is commemorated by the running of the Group 3 John Porter Stakes, a mile and a half contest for older horses, at the course each April.

The round course at Newbury is a left-handed oval, approximately 15 furlongs in circumference, with a 5-furlong straight. There is a also a straight mile course. The National Hunt course is situated inside the Flat course and, consequently, a furlong or so shorter. All the courses undulate, gently, throughout, but wide, sweeping turns make Newbury galloping in nature and ideal for big, long-striding types. Indeed, it is considered one of the fairest courses in the country under both codes.

On the Flat, the seasonal highlight is the Group 1 Lockinge Stakes, run over mile and open to older horses, in May. The roll of honour includes Brigadier Gerard and Frankel, to name but two. Under National Hunt rules, Newbury is known for the Ladbrokes Trophy, formerly the Hennessy Gold Cup, Betfair Hurdle, Game Spirit Chase and Denman Chase, the result of any of which almost invariably has a effect on the market for the corresponding ‘championship’ race at the Cheltenham Festival.